Live Like Thoreau

The Kaya cabin features a reclaimed metal and wood exterior, and its front porch overlooks the community.

The Kaya cabin features a reclaimed metal and wood exterior, and its front porch overlooks the community.

By Donna M. Owens

More than 150 years ago, famed philosopher Henry David Thoreau published his iconic book “Walden,” which chronicled his two years living as one with nature in a cabin set on Walden Pond in Massachusetts.

Today, some travelers who seek a Walden-esque experience still want 21st-century amenities and perks. At Blue Moon Rising, a new eco-friendly vacation village nestled in the mountains of Western Maryland, they’ll find the best of both worlds. Following a soft opening in fall 2013, the retreat officially opened to guests June 27.

Tucked away on 15 wooded acres replete with towering oak, hickory and hemlock trees, various flora, fauna and a quiet stream, the property boasts 14 environmentally conscious, compact and energy-efficient cabins (ranging from 300 to 450 square feet) inspired by the tiny-home movement generating buzz across the country.

Dubbed “Waldens” by the staff, each structure was built using repurposed, recycled and local materials, and each one-of-a-kind cabin is filled with a veritable treasure trove of unique architectural features and finds. There’s flooring made of heart yellow pine from Andrew Carnegie’s former locomotive factory in Pittsburgh, for example, and there are intricate doors and windows that were once part of a historic Baltimore-area home.

Rich colors and textures abound, and furnishings mix contemporary and country-cozy pieces, accentuated by local art. Fun, quirky touches include handcrafted light fixtures made from an antique gramophone. A salvaged automobile rearview mirror takes on new purpose as a bathroom looking glass. The overall vibe might best be described as rustic chic.

The Bella Donna cabin features an antique, half-oval window illuminating the main gathering area.

The Bella Donna cabin features an antique, half-oval window illuminating the main gathering area.

A tranquil hideaway

The cabins are clustered on a hilly expanse that offers views of Deep Creek Lake, originally a hydroelectric source and now the largest inland body of water in Maryland. Spanning 3,900 acres with nearly 70 miles of shoreline, it’s a popular haven for fishing, boating, swimming and other water sports that help bring more than 1.1 million visitors annually to Garrett County.

It’s a fitting backdrop for this tranquil hideaway.

“My vision was to create a beautiful, comfortable place where vacation rentals could be integrated with sustainable living,” says Lisa M. Jan, 59, an educator turned developer whose family vacations at the lake spawned the concept of Blue Moon Rising six years ago.

“I wanted to foster an understanding of the natural environment and preserve it as much as possible,” explains Jan. “Every decision made was eco-conscious.”

The floor and ceiling in the Skyeia cabin interior are re-purposed heart pine salvaged from the Andrew Carnegie locomotive shed.

The floor and ceiling in the Skyeia cabin interior are re-purposed heart pine salvaged from the Andrew Carnegie locomotive shed.

Jan and her small, tight-knit team — comprising local builders and craftspeople, among others — have sought to use materials that are reclaimed, recycled or recyclable in the future.

“Whether it’s the materials we use in the cabins or something like landscaping, we weigh what impact it will have on the earth and this community,” says operations manager Elliott Perfetti, an electrical engineer born and raised in Garrett County. “And I can tell you, we don’t let anything go to waste.”

Dirt removed during excavations was sifted, then mixed with clay, lime and water to become the natural plaster coatings on interior and exterior straw-bale walls. Moreover, every tree taken down during the construction process was evaluated for use elsewhere on the property and given a fresh purpose — for instance, as support posts or trim for the cabins.

Elsewhere on the site, cabins have been furnished with the latest green products and technologies, from low-flow toilets to high-efficiency heaters, lighting and insulation.

The ‘Leap of Faith’ onsite office greets visitors upon arrival at Blue Moon Rising.

The ‘Leap of Faith’ onsite office greets visitors upon arrival at Blue Moon Rising.

Good karma

Upon arrival at Blue Moon Rising, guests are welcomed by a staffer at the onsite office — a visually stunning LEED platinum house with a green roof — that everyone calls “Leap of Faith.”

Next, they’re escorted via golf cart up a winding path toward the diminutive cabins, christened with catchy monikers like Sugar Magnolia, Bella Donna and Moonshine.

“They each have a unique design and personality,” says Bill Thomas, the award-winning design builder whose Cranesville-based company, Hobbitat, built the tiny structures primarily from locally sourced, reclaimed lumber and then assembled them onsite.

The office is a visually stunning LEED platinum house that incoprorates green roof.

The office is a visually stunning LEED platinum house that incoprorates green roof.

At the Skyeia cabin, bold red trim stands out against the cedar shake and raw oak logs of the cabin’s exterior. Cabinets have been artfully constructed out of doors collected from salvage piles.

Moonshine has a Murphy bed and a loft-style “bunk-bed” area that provides additional sleeping space, while Funkomatik 513 has a purple door, purple trim and plenty of funky touches. A reclaimed barn-wood interior in Luna Bleu has original paint that has been carefully restored and sealed to maintain the appearance of the wood’s past life. A library ladder has been engineered to serve as steps to the sleeping area.

Bathing options run the gamut; you can sink into a claw-foot tub or soap up under the stars in an outdoor shower.

“We don’t have TVs or phones in the cabins, although there is free WiFi,” says Perfetti, who adds that there’s plenty to keep folks engaged during their stay.

Out back under fragrant pines are a picnic area, a nearby fire pit, a striking open-air pavilion that’s suitable for weddings and parties, and The Phoenix, a community gathering space equipped with a large, sleek kitchen. The pristine property also includes access to hiking trails, kayaks, canoes and pedal boats.

The team is currently developing wellness, nature, arts and other pro-gramming with local experts, designed to cultivate economic, environmental and social sustainability in the community.

“I’m generating good karma and getting good karma back,” says Jan, adding that she believes the picturesque getaway is among the most innovative developments of its kind in the region.“I think we have created a magical place that’s not quite like anywhere else.”

Blue Moon Rising
89 Blue Moon Rising Way,
McHenry, MD 21541
240-442-5287
bluemoonrising.org

Make it a weekend
5 nature-friendly activities in Garrett County

Ecotourism — loosely described as travel thatphasizes nature and conservation with minimal disturbance to one’s environs — seems to be gaining steam, both nationwide and here in Maryland.

In an April 2014 survey from TripAdvisor, 23 percent of its 2,100 respondents reported that they had consciously made an eco-friendly travel choice in the past year. And according to Catherine Batavick, sustainable initiatives administrator with the Maryland Office of Tourism Development, “more consumers and businesses seem to be moving in that direction.”

For Garrett County, that focus is nothing new.

“With over 90,000 acres of parks, lakes and public forestland, we pride ourselves on being green in Garrett County,” says Sarah Duck, director of tourism and marketing for the county. “And in 2013, Deep Creek Lake was named as one of TravelNerd’s top destinations for green travel options.”

The lake and Marsh Mountain, one of the best-known in the region, may be the main attractions, but there’s plenty else to do in the region.

1 Grab a bite, and hear some tunes. Moonshadow Cafe, Blue Moon Rising’s sister business on Main Street in Accident, Md., a few miles from Deep Creek Lake, has a laid-back vibe, local artwork and live music. The restaurant offers lunch and dinner daily, utilizing local ingredients as often as possible. Standouts include the vegan cauliflower “wings,” tossed in spicy sauce, and the hibiscus lavender iced tea. They also serve craft beer, organic wine and small-batch spirits. moonshadowcafe.com

2 Watch artisan cheese makers at work. Also on Main Street, Firefly Farms Creamery and Market allows guests to watch its artisans handcraft its award-winning goat cheeses through a viewing window. “We use milk purchased from local family farmers,” says co-owner Pablo Solanet. The market sells gourmet cheeses, along with quality pastas, breads, crackers, pates, wines and desserts. fireflyfarms.com

3 Savor Mother Nature. Several companies in the region offer guided tours. One to try is All Earth Eco Tours, which offers everything from kayaking to hiking and eco-tours. “We give visitors information about the history and heritage of the area, as well as the ecology and wildlife,” says Owner and Program Director Crede Calhoun. “And if we’re lucky, we may spot a pair of bald eagles who nest high on the mountaintop.” allearthecotours.com

4 Get wet and wild. The Adventure Sports Center bills this outdoor attraction as the only mountaintop recirculating whitewater course in the world. adventuresportscenter.com

5 Go glamping in a yurt. Savage River Lodge, which has garnered state awards for its solar energy and other eco-friendly policies, recently unveiled its latest offering —the yurt. For the uninitiated, a yurt is a circular tent on a collapsible framework that was traditionally used by nomads in Central Asia. But these yurts take it up a notch. They’re equipped with a dome skylight, a radiant warm floor-board heating system, gas log fireplaces, king-size beds, cozy leather couches and large baths. Best of all, there are decks to sit outside and commune with Mother Nature. savageriverlodge.com

For more attractions in Garrett County, visit visitmaryland.org.